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About

People:

At TCU there’s English for multilingual people: for students, faculty, and staff. TCU encourages the student, the teacher scholar, and the person otherwise in the workforce to deploy their full languaging repertoire and empowers them to be skillful mediators of the one language named “English.”

Programs, courses, trainings (for multilinguals, as an integral part of the School of Interdisciplinary Studies at TCU):

    • The interdisciplinary TESOL Certificate for teaching English to speakers of other languages, 18 credits total.
    • The full time Intensive English Program, pre-degree, mid-degree, and post-degree, for elective credits in English for speakers of other languages (ESOL).
    • Specific academic training for MBA Program graduate students and Neeley Fellows Program undergraduates; for UNTHSC faculty members and post docs; and for teachers and ESL specialists in FWISD.
    • Customized professional development training for TCU employees; for au pairs; for asylum seekers; for refugees; for undocumented individuals.

Peculiar Phrases (and Pronunciations)

Acronyms / ˈæk rə nɪm / are words “formed from the initial letters or groups of letters of words in a set phrase or series of words and pronounced as a separate word, as Wac from Women’s Army Corps.

Acronyms are also known as (a.k.a.)  the “Alphabet Soup” of the Academy.

Bilingual / baɪˈlɪŋ gwəl or, Canadian English, -ˈlɪŋ gyu əl / –

adjective

1. able to speak two languages with the facility of a native speaker.
spoken, written, or containing similar information in two different languages:
2. a bilingual dictionary; Public notices at the embassy are bilingual.
of, involving, or using two languages:
3. a bilingual community; bilingual schools.

noun

4. a bilingual person.

CRES – / krɛs /  The Department of Comparative Race & Ethnic Studies within the School of Interdisciplinary Studies at TCU.

Within CRES are two academic entities:

African American and Africana Studies

African American and Africana Studies (AAAS) minor is an interdisciplinary program that offers an introduction to the study of African intellectual heritages locally and globally. The AAAS minor and emphasis focus on the global links across the African diaspora, and examines the contributions of the African intellectual heritages as key components of American culture.

Latina/o Studies

Latina/o studies minors explore the multiple cultures and traditions of the Latina/o world in the United States, and their significance in American life.

EFL / i ɛf ɛl/ – English as a Foreign Language

English language programs in non-English-speaking countries where English is not used as the lingua franca. It is also used in some U.S. university programs where international students study English and are likely to return to their home countries after graduation or finishing course work.

from – “Common Acronyms in the TESOL Profession

Emergent Bilingual / ɪˈmɜrʤənt baɪˈlɪŋ gwəl / –

English language learners are in fact emergent bilinguals. That is, through school and through acquiring English, these children become bilingual, able to continue to function in their home language as well as in English, their new language and that of school. When officials and educators ignore the bilingualism that these students can and often must develop through schooling in the United States, they perpetuate inequities in the education of these children. That is, they discount the home languages and cultural understandings of these children and assume their educational needs are the same as a monolingual child.

from

García, Ofelia, Jo Anne Kleifgen and Lorraine Falchi. 2008. From English language learners to emergent bilinguals. In Equity Matters: Research Review No. 1. New York: A Research Initiative of the Campaign for Educational Equity.

article clipping from Emergent bilinguals and TESOL. What´s in a Name?

from

García, O. 2009. Emergent bilinguals and TESOL. What´s in a Name? In TESOL Quarterly 43(2): 322-326. special issue edited by Shelley Taylor.

ENFL / i-ɛn-ɛf-ɛl / – The old designation for ESOL courses at TCU. It stood for ENglish as a Foreign Language courses, as distinct from ENGL courses (or ENGLish Department courses).

ENGL / i-ɛn-ʤi-ɛl / – TCU’s course designation for ENGLish Department courses. IEM students take one of these courses, ENGL 10803.

English / ɪŋglɪʃ / – 1 named language, a very dominant language in the global community.

We — the 7.5 billion individual members of the global community — use 7,102 different living languages. More often than not we speak 2 or 3 or more different languages together as our full linguistic repertoire.

Some 1.5 billion of us on our planet use the 1 language named “English.” Approximately 65% of us employ it as our 2nd or 3rd or 4th language. Only around 35% of us speak it as our natal language. China is the largest English speaking nation, with close to 400 million users of the tongue, more than the entire population of the United States.

MapNearly 1.5 million of us worldwide teach English to speakers of other languages. A full 80% of us teaching English have spoken other languages first. Only 20% of us have learned to teach this idiom after growing up speaking it.

We, the 13,340 students, staff and faculty members of Texas Christian University use this 1 language predominately here. Those of us here studying English as an additional language, teaching it, or studying to teach it, also use some 23 other languages combined.

ELL / i ɛl-ɛl / –

One of the most misunderstood issues in pre-K-12 education today is how to educate children who are not yet proficient in English.When policymakers refer to these students as English language learners (ELLs)—as many school district officials presently do—or as limited English proficient students (LEPs)—as [USA] federal legislators did in the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB)—it signals the omission of an idea that is critical to the discussion of equity in the teaching of these children.

English language learners are in fact emergent bilinguals. That is, through school and through acquiring English, these children become bilingual, able to continue to function in their home language as well as in English, their new language and that of school. When officials and educators ignore the bilingualism that these students can and often must develop through schooling in the United States, they perpetuate inequities in the education of these children. That is, they discount the home languages and cultural understandings of these children and assume their educational needs are the same as a monolingual child.

from

García, Ofelia, Jo Anne Kleifgen and Lorraine Falchi. 2008. From English language learners to emergent bilinguals. In Equity Matters: Research Review No. 1. New York: A Research Initiative of the Campaign for Educational Equity.

ESOL / ˈi sɔl, ˈɛs əl /

noun

English for speakers of other languages: a field of language training including EFL and ESL.

Compare TESOL

Three entities within the School of Interdisciplinary Studies at TCU:

IdeaFactory

The TCU IdeaFactory is dedicated to supporting the innovation spirit of TCU students, staff and faculty by providing an environment and resources where an idea can be advanced to a prototype, and potentially, beyond.

Integrative Learning Initiatives

We create initiatives that help students reflect on their learning experiences and integrate ideas, insights, and experiences across the curriculum and co-curriculum.

Interdisciplinary Inquiry

If your academic interests extend beyond traditional academic disciplines, the Interdisciplinary Inquiry major can help you achieve your academic and professional goals

IEP / aɪ-i-pi / The full time (20 hours per week of classes), year round Intensive English Program at TCU.

LEP /ɛl i pi, lɛp/ i ɛl-ɛl / –

One of the most misunderstood issues in pre-K-12 education today is how to educate children who are not yet proficient in English.When policymakers refer to these students as English language learners (ELLs)—as many school district officials presently do—or as limited English proficient students (LEPs)—as [USA] federal legislators did in the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB)—it signals the omission of an idea that is critical to the discussion of equity in the teaching of these children.

English language learners are in fact emergent bilinguals. That is, through school and through acquiring English, these children become bilingual, able to continue to function in their home language as well as in English, their new language and that of school. When officials and educators ignore the bilingualism that these students can and often must develop through schooling in the United States, they perpetuate inequities in the education of these children. That is, they discount the home languages and cultural understandings of these children and assume their educational needs are the same as a monolingual child.

from

García, Ofelia, Jo Anne Kleifgen and Lorraine Falchi. 2008. From English language learners to emergent bilinguals. In Equity Matters: Research Review No. 1. New York: A Research Initiative of the Campaign for Educational Equity.

Monolingual / ˌmɒn əˈlɪŋ gwəl or, Canadian, -ˈlɪŋ gyu əl / –

adjective

1. knowing or able to use only one language; monoglot.
2. spoken or written in only one language.

noun

3. a monolingual person.

Multilingual / ˌmʌl tiˈlɪŋ gwəl, ˌmʌl taɪ- or, Canadian, -ˈlɪŋ gyu əl / –

adjective

1. using or able to speak several or many languages with some facility.
2. spoken or written in several or many languages:
a multilingual broadcast.
3. dealing with or involving several or many languages:
a multilingual dictionary of business terms.

noun

4. a multilingual person.

Plurilingual / plʊr iˈlɪŋ gwəl/

It was the Council of Europe that initially defined the difference between plurilingualism, as an individual characteristic of individuals, and multilingualism as a societal phenomenon. The European Union is multilingual as a supranational body, but its citizens should be plurilingual. They define plurilingualism as:

. The intrinsic capacity of all speakers to use and learn, alone or through teaching, more than onelanguage. The ability to use several languages to varying degrees and for distinct purposes is defined in the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (1996, 168) as the
ability ‘to use languages for the purposes of communication and to take part in intercultural
action, where a person, viewed as a social agent, has proficiency, of varying degrees, in several
languages and experience of several cultures.’ This ability is concretized in a repertoire of
languages a speaker can use. The goal of teaching is to develop this competence (hence the
expression: plurilingualism as a competence).

from

García, O. & Otheguy, R. (2019). Plurilingualism and translanguaging: Commonalities and divergences. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism. 10.1080/13670050.2019.1598932

SL / ɛs ɛl / – Second Language (as in ESL, or English as a Second Language; and SLA, or Second Language Acquisition)

SIS / sɪs / – The School of Interdisciplinary Studies at TCU.

TCU / ti si ju / – Texas Christian University, www.tcu.edu

TEFL / tɛfəl / – Teaching English as a Foreign Language.

TESL / tɛsəl / – Teaching English as a Second Language.

TESOL / ˈtisɔl / – The inherently interdisciplinary academic fields of Teaching English as a Second or Other Language, aka Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages.

TESOL is also understood “in three dimensions: as a profession, as a field of study, and as an international association.”

WGST / ˈdʌbəl juʤiɛsti / – The Department of Women & Gender Studies in the School of Interdisciplinary Studies at TCU.