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CRES News Digest Vol. 5, Issue 3

Welcome to the CRES News Digest!
We are eager to spread any good news, perspectives, and events that our students, faculty, or staff have to share with the larger TCU and Fort Worth community. If you would like to share any CRES-related events, publications, volunteer opportunities, jobs, internships, or conference information in the next CRES News Digest, please send your suggestions to Cecilia Hill by Monday, September 21st.

In Solidarity,

Cecilia Hill, CRES Graduate Assistant
Mark Valenzuela, CRES Undergraduate Assistant
Dr. Jane Mantey, Associate Director of CRES


CRES Spotlight

Latinx Heritage Month begins on September 15th. All events are virtual and all are welcome! Click on image below for full flyer.


A message from Stacie McCormick of The Bluest Eye @ 50 Committee

Dear All, it is my genuine pleasure to share with you a project that has been long in the making and hopefully an exciting opportunity for engagement with the TCU community, particularly the English Department, WGST, CRES, and the Mary Couts Burnett Library.

I, in partnership with Sarah Robbins, Fran Huckaby, Curt Rode, Ammie Harrison and a group of phenomenal students, worked together to create the website thebluesteye50.com. It is an interactive website that captures our original goal of holding an on-campus symposium marking the 50th anniversary since the publication of Toni Morrison’s ground-shifting novel The Bluest Eye. When COVID-19 sent us into our homes, we put our heads together to see how we could still bring to fruition the work we began in 2018. This website is the result. We encourage you to tour it, contribute to it if you feel compelled, and share it with your units.

In tandem, we hope that you share with your respective units the corresponding virtual symposium taking place on Saturday, October 10. There will be a teaching panel at 10:00 am with some wonderful panelists including those from our community and at 2:00 pm there will be a research panel featuring a collective of Black literature scholars from the DFW area. We feel this would be a great opportunity for faculty, staff and students to engage in a community event give our limited means to provide those. We encourage to you incentivize participation among your students in whatever ways you deem fit.

Click on the image above for full flyer and for registration information.


COVID-19 Update

To stay informed on COVID-19 cases at TCU visit the new COVID-19 Dashboard. The dashboard includes daily cases and total cases for a better understanding of trends, in addition to current active cases.

Positive cases of COVID-19 increased during the first week of school. Be sure you are following all TCU COVID-19 guidelines including wearing a mask while on campus, maintaining social distancing, and avoiding any large gatherings off-campus.

For information on changes due to COVID19, please check out the TCU COVID19 Student Resources webpage.

Additionally, if you need to visit the CRES offices, please first make an appointment with CRES Administrative Assistant Toni Taylor by email or call the office at 817-257-4144


CRES Suggested Readings

A Farewell Letter to DEI Work

Tatiana McInnis, Ph.D., newly hired Cecil H. and Ida Green Visiting Assistant Professor in CRES, writes, “Such [Diversity and Inclusion] departments, centers, divisions and programs are spaces of impossibility; they cannot do the things they are tasked with as they are not empowered to hold community members accountable when they fail to uphold stated investments in equity. They operate on a hope that edifying others with best practices means that those people will implement such practices. They exist not to create systemic change but as evidence that the work has already been done. Here, organizations say, is our investment in equity: engage with it, ignore it or belittle it as you’d like.

Like most diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives and programs created within large, well-resourced institutions, these roles are additive rather than transformative. They add to already bloated administrative expenditures. They don’t and can’t interrogate institutional investments. They don’t and can’t put faculty or staff members on probation for failing to uphold a stated commitment to a welcoming environment for all. A world that values Black lives, that understands that Black lives are beloved, will look radically different than this one…”

The Literature of White Liberalism

“During the Great Awokening of 2020, precipitated by the uprisings following the concurrent May 25, 2020, murder of George Floyd and the Amy Cooper Central Park incident, the media tide turned from handwringing about euphemistic “race relations” to focus on what Eduardo Bonilla-Silva has deftly termed “racism without racists” and what Mica Pollock has described as colormuteness—the inability or refusal to talk about race and racism. The literature of white liberalism attempts to address this status quo. Of the books examined here, two present themselves as “how-tos,” two use “talking” in their titles, and four explicitly name whiteness.

…The literature of white liberalism is obviously not a decolonial abolitionist literature. It succeeds by allowing the reading class to think about antiracism untethered from anti-imperialism and anti-capitalism. That is not to say that it has nothing to offer, nor that the authors are pro-capitalist shills. While all of these books offer sharp analyses of the way capitalism destroys Black and minoritized lives, they mention, but don’t center, the powerful critiques of capitalism issued by Black and minoritized traditions. This is something both white liberalism and white leftism have in common, despite being multiracial formations.” – Melissa Phruksachart, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Film, Television, and Media at the University of Michigan


Campus Virtual Events

“The Legacy of Rudolfo Anaya: the Father of Chicano Literature” Featuring Robert Con Davis-Undiano, Ph.D.

Wednesday, September 16, 2020
5:00pm

Please join us via zoom:
https://tcu.zoom.us/s/92149589667

Click on image for full flyer. 

 

 

Netflix Screening: Gentefied
Friday, September 18, 2020
7:00pm

Please join us in watching the first two episodes of the Netflix series, Gentefied with a panel discussion of both episodes by members of the United Latino Association, Society for Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science, and Chi Upsilon Sigma.

Please join us via zoom:
https://tcu.zoom.us/s/92149589667

Click on image for full flyer. 

“The U.S. Latino Electorate and Voting in the Age of Trump” Featuring Gastón Espinosa, Ph.D.
Monday, September 21, 2020
5:30pm

Please join us via zoom:
https://tcu.zoom.us/s/92149589667

 
 

Click on image for full flyer. 

 

Teens in Cinema: WGST Film Series

What makes a film a “teen movie?” Are movies about teens the same as teen movies? And what is a “teen,” for that matter? Come watch classic and new films and examine the genre through the lens of gender, race, sexuality, and class. We’ll discuss the invention of the teenager and its relation to film. Click on the flyer for more details. 

 
 

 

 

On behalf of Muriel Cormican, Professor of German and Chair

You are invited to the WoW (Worlds of Words), Modern Language Studies’ second series celebrating linguistic and cultural diversity–virtual this term though. The series includes speakers from departments across the college and university, both faculty and students. Please join us as possible, and please share information about the events with students. Our goal is to emphasize plurilingualism (English included) and transnational trends and relationships, so no previous experience with non-English languages is required. All are welcome. Click the image for full flyer.
 
 

Diversity Day Conference
Thursday, October 1, 2020

REFLECT. REIMAGINE. RECONNECT. 

The theme recognizes the need to reflect on our past and appreciate the complex ways our lives intersect so that we can build a new movement focused on personal and systemic change. Click on the image for full flyer. 

 


Community Virtual Events

Food as Cultural Identity: European, African and Indigenous Foods and Crops in America with Peter Martínez, Ph.D.

FREE Virtual Program
Saturday, September 12, 2020
10:30am to Noon

 

Register today to join us for our first VIRTUAL Community History Workshop program on ZOOM*: Food as Cultural Identity: European, African, and Indigenous Foods and Crops in America with Dr. Peter Martínez! In honor of Hispanic American Heritage Month, Dr. Martínez’s will discuss how crops and foods in the Pre-Columbian Americas impacted European and Asian countries through the Columbian Exchange beginning in the sixteenth century. You will hear how Europeans and Mexican elites viewed indigenous American foods and learn how the relationship between food and cultural identity evolved as European, African, and Indigenous foods and crops to combine to give us foods that are common to us today.

Dr. Peter Martínez serves as an Associate Professor of History at Tarrant County College – Northeast Campus. He earned both his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in History from the University of Texas at Arlington and his Doctorate in History from the University of North Texas in 2017. Dr. Martínez’s dissertation, “Ready to Run: Fort Worth’s Mexicans in Search of Representation, 1960-2000,” was awarded Best Dissertation in Tejano/a Studies by the National Association for Chicana and Chicano Studies – Tejas Foco in 2018. He is an active Board Member for HOLA Tarrant County. 

Register Now!

*Never used Zoom before? Try it out during our short informal test session, “How to Get Your Zoom On.” To join us, sign up HERE for a free Zoom account , then follow this LINK [Meeting ID: 828 5227 3479 Passcode: 586517] on September 5 at 11:30am. We’ll meet you there to help you understand Zoom and work through any audio or video issues before the September 12 program. Questions? Contact LeAnna Schooley at l.schooley@tcu.edu before noon Friday, September 4.


Opportunity for CRES Students

Intercultural Development Research Association seeks to change that picture during the next legislative session through the Education Policy Fellows of Color Program. IDRA’s fellows will gain real-world advocacy experiences and training during the Texas legislative session, work with coalitions, students and families to craft a community-centered education policy agenda, and join a network of advocates and policy influencers focused on improving racial equity in education policymaking spaces.

Click on the flyer to learn how to become an IDRA fellow. Deadline to apply is September 25, 2020.

 

 

The Black Doctoral Network welcomes current undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral students, and postdoctoral scholars of all racial backgrounds to participate in their online poster session at the 8th Annual Black Doctoral Network Virtual Conference, to be held on October 29-31, 2020. If you have a research project, thesis, or dissertation you would like to present as a poster at a professional conference, the poster session is a good opportunity for you to showcase your academic work and receive constructive feedback from scholars ina friendly and engaging environment. For more information and to submit an abstract click here. Click on the image for the full flyer. 


Job Opportunities for CRES Graduate Students

African American Studies:

Santa Clara University

UC Davis

Williams College

Auburn

Latinx Studies

Williams College

Cal State Long Beach (Latinx Political Economy)

Cal State Long Beach (Latinx Rhetoric and Composition)

Asian American Studies

Rice University

Indigenous Studies

Swathmore College

Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies

UC Berkeley


A little satire . . .

We Condemn All Institutional Racism Except Our Own

by Amanda Lehr and Tatiana McInnis

Students, Faculty, Staff, and Alumni,

We feel it to be our solemn duty to make a statement about recent events before all our peer institutions beat us to the punch. In this time of division, we flailed through the Provost’s book of inspirational, unifying quotes and landed on the aphorism, “Change begins at home.” As we reflect on our own campus home, we definitively state our intent to stand against hate, prejudice, and other harmful nouns, as well as to fight racism where it lives: elsewhere . . . read more.


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